Re-invent, Re-brand, Re-design Your Career Workshop

October 25, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under What's New

CBR003054Sat. -  Nov. 5th, 10 to 1pm, Westbrook CT

Embrace your own unique style to navigate your career path, attract clients, impress bosses, dazzle potential employers or stick out from the crowd in this half-day workshop.

You will:

  • Identify your unique brand
  • Craft a personalized branding statement
  • Discover ways to use your brand to maximize results
  • Declare what makes you UNFORGETTABLE!

Champion the true YOU and your style, skills and passions instead of following what you “should” or “shouldn’t” be doing. Explore how to develop your distinctive brand and discover the benefits of re-inventing and re-designing yourself and your career to let your authenticity shine through. This workshop is the perfect follow-up to Barb’s conference presentation by the same name.

COST: $75.00 per person. Register now!


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Barb Scala,
Transition Strategist & Coach and co-author of Sanity Savers: Tips for Women to Live a Balanced Life facilitates this insightful workshop. 


Hummus Delight

September 28, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under Bloomin in the Kitchen, What's New, snacks

Hummus made with freshly grown sprouts is a healthy variation to the traditional recipe. “Sprouts are  one of the healthiest foods you can grow in your kitchen for pennies and only a few minutes of time,”  claims Dr. Susan Smith Jones. This hummus recipe notably skips tahini and lessens the fat content, although you can add tahini for richer taste if desired.

hummus2 cups garbanzo beans (chickpeas), fresh cooked or canned (reserve the liquid) or use freshly sprouted beans
2 Tbsp. plus 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice
1–2 cloves garlic, pressed or finely minced
1/4 tsp. ground cumin
1 Tbsp. minced red onion
2 Tbsp. minced fresh parsley
1/4 tsp. sea salt
Cayenne pepper to taste
Fresh cracked pepper to taste

In a food processor, blend the chickpeas, lemon juice, garlic, and cumin with some of the reserved liquid. If you are using your own sprouted garbanzo beans for the recipes, add enough water to give it the best consistency for you. Add parsley and red onion and season with salt and pepper. Pulse briefly to mix. Keep refrigerated until ready to serve.

Variations: For black-bean hummus, add 1/2 cup black beans to the recipe when blending. For roasted-red-pepper hummus, add 1/2 cup roasted red pepper to the recipe. For roasted-garlic hummus, add 3 tablespoons roasted garlic. For roasted-onion hummus, add 1⁄3 cup roasted onion and 1 tablespoon of fresh chives, minced. For dill-roasted-yellow-pepper hummus, add 3 tablespoons fresh minced dill and 1/2 cup roasted yellow pepper. For spicy hummus, add 1 jalapeno pepper, minced, and 1⁄8 tsp. cayenne. To any of the above recipes, add ¼–½ cup tahini, if you want a richer taste and don’t mind the extra fat or calories.z


Open-Face Hummus Red Clover Sandwich

Dr. Susan’s favorite sandwich can also be a raw-foods meal by using a raw cracker or toast and the raw hummus recipe above.

2 slices of whole grain bread or toast — you can also use a large-size cracker
Hummus Delight (recipe above)
Red clover sprouts
Tomato — sliced
Red onion — sliced

Spread the hummus on the toast or cracker, add onion, tomato, and Red Clover sprouts. The order doesn’t really matter except to spread on the hummus first. You can even drizzle it with some dressing, if you like. For a variation,  add some shredded carrot, strips of sweet bell peppers, or put all of the ingredients in a pocket of whole grain pita bread. Any way you build this sandwich, it will please your taste buds.

Serves 1-2

You’ll find a variety of recipes for hummus in Dr. Susan Smith Jones’ full color recipe book Recipes for Health Bliss: Using NatureFoods & Lifestyle Choices to Rejuvenate Your Body & Life

LISTEN: Sprouting Your Way to Vitality (Dr. Susan on Bloom Talk)



Bloom Groups Forming Now!

June 6, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under Events, What's New

screen-shot-2011-04-07-at-54900-pmGrow your life goals with the gals!

Balance * Wellness
Passion & Purpose

Want to meet friendly women and stay on task  with life goals, balance, even explore your dreams and have some fun? Then join one of several “bloom” groups facilitated by Barb, forming now.

What is a bloom group, you ask?
Goal oriented small groups of wonderful women like you (6 to 8 in each group)  have fun and fuller lives living with more purpose & passion, balance and wellness.  Based on the premise that connection and a community of women is healthy to body, mind and soul, you work on individual life goals and dreams while forming friendships and support in a group setting. Instead of a networking group or a book group, this is a connecting group for you to grow, blossom, bloom!

  • Inspiration & support
  • Work on individual goals, big or small
  • Community, connection & friendship
  • Group format helps you stay on task
  • Meets twice a month (total of 6 gatherings)
  • Always fun & insightful!

If you’ve been trying to move forward, get out of overwhelm with your “to do” list, or simply want to connect with like-minded women and build new friendships, a bloom group is for you!! I’m so confident these groups make a difference in our overall happiness and well-being that I’m happy to offer a free initial consultation over the phone.

“I guarantee you’ll get something out of attending just once!!”

Where? Westbrook CT OR Contact Barb for information on joining a Bloom Tele-Group.

Cost $150 for six gatherings

Groups meet twice a month in Westbrook, other Shoreline CT locations TBD or over the phone (tele-groups).

Email barb@bloomwithbarb.com or call 203-521-1129 for an initial phone consultation and to answer your questions.

3 Session “Sprout” Program

April 28, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under What's New

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Got a Goal?
It’s time to sprout it!
Best part? No huge investment.

Only $99!

Sprout in a new direction or let your ideas start to grow in this mini-coaching program designed to help give you quick insight with your life and career goals!

Ever need an extra pair of eyes and ears to help think through your agenda and goals? One-on-one’s with Barb will help you formulate a plan. 3 shorter sessions with big results!


Call Barb today 203–521-1129 or barb@bloomwithbarb.com.
Special offer. Limit one program per customer.

Butternut Squash, Spinach & Sage Pasta

img_00481I love pasta but have sworn off white flours. That’s why  I like to use spelt spaghetti or linguini for this recipe. I find rice pastas to be a bit gooey and whole wheat pastas to be…well, too whole wheat. Although not gluten free, spelt is an artesian grain I find easy to digest, healthy and as close in taste and texture to the pastas I grew up with.

This dish was inspired by a Whole Foods butternut ravioli recipe. I wanted more color (and garlic!) and less cheese and butter.  So I added fresh spinach bountiful in the spring, used olive oil and fresh garlic cloves, and traded cheese ravioli for spelt pasta. Yum!

2 cups butternut squash, cut in cubes
1 onion, diced
3-4 cloves garlic, mInced
4 tablespoons chopped fresh sage leaves
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 1/2 cups organic vegetable broth
1 box (8 oz) spelt spaghetti or linguini
2 cups packed fresh spinach leave
s

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a roasting pan, toss squash in 2-3 tablespoons olive oil, 2 tablespoons chopped sage and salt and pepper to taste. Roast in oven approximately 25 minutes till tender.  Cook spaghetti according to package instructions. Add remaining olive oil to large skillet with onions and garlic and saute on medium heat until onion is translucent. Add remainder of sage leaves and vegetable broth. Simmer for 3 minutes. Add drained spaghetti, butternut squash and spinach and quickly toss until spinach is wilted. Serve alone or with grated parmesan if desired.

Vacation from Technology

March 9, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under Blog, What's New

42-16535651I just came back from vacation.  Even though I went south to sun, surf, warm weather (I’m sure you heard about our weather in the northeast this winter) and wore cute sundresses and sandals, the highlight of my vacation was taking a break from technology.

But, I didn’t go cold turkey. It was more of a voluntary withdrawal. Even though I had a cell phone to keep up with emails and my Mac in a new carrying case, by the second day I was forgetting to plug my phone into the charger and the only website I linked to all week was Weather.com. Away went Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. My email inbox? By the end of the week it was piled high with e-newsletters and a slew of people selling products or programs or telling me how they can better promote my website. What about texting? I figured if it was important, they’d call.

A break from cyberland is great. I recommend it. It allows you to be present in the moment and not tied to what’s going on somewhere else. Part of my Seeds for Success is to be positive and being present is a subset. So you don’t miss out on what’s going on right before you or ignoring the people you are with in the moment.

I’ll have to admit that I do get aggravated when I’m in a meeting and it’s interrupted to answer a text. Or worse yet, when out to dinner someone takes a call at the table. This disrupts the art of being present and the flow of our time together. It also makes the person who is sitting there feel a bit uncomfortable.

Next time I’m on vacation, I’m going to leave the computer at home. My phone? Okay, so  I won’t totally disengage from the world but if I don’t charge it, what good is it? Better yet, how about periodic staycations from technology too. Unplugging while at home has to be therapeutic. Maybe I could go cyberless one day a week. But now I get ahead of myself.

Try unplugging when on vacation. You might notice something you could have missed.

Best Medicine for Health: Girlfriends

February 10, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under Blog, What's New

Friends working togetherDo something good for your health. Have some girlfriend time!

I know all too well the benefits of women gathering and the positive energy that flows from our girlfriends. So I thought I’d pass along an email I received about how girlfriends are good for your health.

“I just finished taking an evening class at Stanford. The last lecture was
on the mind-body connection - the relationship between stress and disease.
The speaker (head of psychiatry at Stanford) said, among other things,
that one of the best things that a man could do for his health is to be
married to a woman whereas for a woman, one of the best things she could
do for her health was to nurture her relationships with her girlfriends.

At first everyone laughed, but he was serious.
Women connect with each other differently and provide support systems that
help each other to deal with stress and difficult life experiences.
Physically this quality “girlfriend time” helps us to create more serotonin
- a neurotransmitter that helps combat depression and can create a general
feeling of well being. Women share feelings whereas men often form
relationships around activities. They rarely sit down with a buddy and
talk about how they feel about certain things or how their personal lives
are going. Jobs? Yes. Sports? Yes. Cars? Yes. Fishing, hunting, golf?
Yes. But their feelings? Rarely.

Women do it all of the time. We share from our souls with our
sisters/mothers, and evidently that is very good for our health. He said
that spending time with a friend is just as important to our general
health as jogging or working out at a gym.

There’s a tendency to think that when we are “exercising” we are doing
something good for our bodies, but when we are hanging out with friends,
we are wasting our time and should be more productively engaged—not true.
In fact, he said that failure to create and maintain quality personal
relationships with other humans is as dangerous to our physical health as
smoking!

So every time you hang out to schmooze with a gal pal, just pat yourself
on the back and congratulate yourself for doing something good for your
health! We are indeed very, very lucky. Sooooo let’s toast to our
friendship with our girlfriends. Evidently it’s very good for our health.”

Roasted Garlic

garlic1Recipe and comments from Health Bliss: Using Nature Foods & Lifestyle Choices to Rejuvenate Your Body & Life authored by Dr. Susan Smith Jones:

This simple-to-make treat is delicious and nutritious. A couple of times each week, you can smell garlic roasting in my home. Slowly baked, it becomes mild and so soft that you can spread it on bread, toast or crackers like butter. Bake several heads at a time and keep them in the fridge, then warm them up in the microwave for a few seconds before using. I often squeeze all of the soft cloves from their skins and put them in a small bowl to use in a variety of dishes such as mashed potatoes, soups, salads, dips, spreads, sauces, and

marinades.

6 heads garlic
1/2 tsp. dried thyme
1/2 tsp. sea salt
nonstick cooking spray
water

Preheat oven to 300° F. Slice ½ inch off the top of each garlic head (not the root end). Rub off as much loose garlic skin as possible without separating the cloves. Lightly spray a small baking dish with nonstick cooking spray. Place the skinned garlic heads, cut-side up, clustered together in the baking dish. Sprinkle the top of each head with a dash of salt and thyme. Add ¼–1⁄3 cup of purified water to the baking pan, surrounding the garlic. Cover and bake until the cloves are tender when pierced with a knife and beginning to pop out, about 60 – 90 minutes, depending on the size. If you turn up the

ROASTED GARLIC

oven to a higher temperature, it roasts faster. Serve hot or cooled to room temperature. I sometimes serve a whole head of garlic to each of my guests. They can squeeze out the soft cloves from the skins to spread on baguette toast or any variety of whole-grain breads, instead of using butter or margarine.

Variation 1: Instead of salt, drizzle some tamari or Bragg Liquid Aminos over the top of each head. It gives them a nice flavor and darker color. Or substitute other herbs such as oregano, rosemary, basil, dill, cilantro, chives, or cumin for the thyme.

Variation 2: Take 3–4 heads of garlic, separate all of the cloves, and peel away all of the skin. Discard any cloves that are very small. In a small saucepan, combine the garlic cloves with ½ cup Vegetable Broth. Bring to a high simmer, cover, reduce heat to a gentle simmer, and cook until the cloves are tender but not mushy, about 20 minutes. Check periodically to make sure the broth hasn’t evaporated. If necessary, add some more. When cooked, the cloves are as soft as butter, easy to use, and will last 2–3 days in the refrigerator.

Garlic is a superfood that has been studied worldwide for its medicinal properties. It’s packed with antioxidants known to fend off cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, and overall aging.

By Susan Smith Jones, PhD ©. Health Bliss: Using Nature Foods & Lifestyle Choices to Rejuvenate Your Body & Life published by Hay House Publishers and available at www.SusanSmithJones.com

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LISTEN: Dr. Susan Smith Jones on
Bloom Talk
Surefire Ways to Expand, Love, Intimacy & Romance

Brave Enough to Switch Careers & Pursue My Dream!

February 1, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under Finding A Passion, What's New, Who's Blooming

Jen Conroy

Jen Conroy

It took me 38 years to figure out that I need to be working with my hands every day.

I studied journalism at Northwestern and pursued a career in magazine editing in New York, but I never felt I was truly myself all those years. I’d always had creative hobbies—painting, interior design, knitting—but they were always just hobbies. And I’d always felt an enormous, guilt-driven responsibility to continue with my journalism career. It was my job, after all. I had gone to an expensive college to pursue it. How could I waste my professional contacts?

Then one Christmas I decided to make jewelry for gifts, and I couldn’t believe how much fun it was. I was thrilled to get positive feedback from my friends and family members, who told me that I had a knack for it, and that I should consider selling my designs online. Of course, my first instinct was to say, “I can’t do that.” There’s such a glut of jewelry in the market. What could I possibly contribute? But the more I thought about it, the more excited I became.

Once I decided to officially pursue my own jewelry business, friends bent over backwards to help me. My friend Kathleen’s husband, David Maloney (www.ocomolo.com), generously offered to design and manage my web site. Through David I met a fabulous local photographer, Catherine Kiernan, who offered to barter with me. (Thank you for your support, Catherine!) Another friend, Jen Hurley, also takes fabulous pictures for me. And I’m grateful to all my delightful, good-natured friends who have agreed time and again to be my models, devoting big parts of their day to smiling for the camera. Some of these dear people have even offered to host jewelry parties to get the word out. Thank you!

I feel lucky that it only took me 38 years to figure out that true joy—for me—comes from working with my hands. What a simple thing that is! It’s not rocket science! And yet for so many years I had ignored this creative compulsion in myself and tossed it aside to the relegated “hobby” pile.  I thank God that I had the courage to look at myself and re-evaluate my goals. I thank God that I felt brave enough to pursue this dream, despite the fact that it’s a “long shot.”

When wise people say it’s the journey, not the destination, I finally get it! Every day I feel such joy as I sit at my dining room table and create jewelry. There is joy in every step of the process! I’m not sure where it will lead. I do have a few long-term goals. I’d love to be able to donate a portion of my profits to a special need. (I’m still working on the profit part!) But I truly believe that by pursuing something you love, and infusing everything you do with love, you will bring out the best in yourself and others, and ultimately bring good to the world.

Listen: Jen Conroy on Bloom Talk

Jen’s Website: www.JenConroyDesign.com

Got a Goal but No Time? Take the 10 Minute Challenge

January 31, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under Blog, What's New

j0438870If you have 10 minutes, you can start blooming!

Another Bloom Party yesterday and someone asked, “I have things I want to do with my life, but how can I find the time?” My answer, “If you can find 10 minutes a day, you can start blooming!” Here’s an old article newly revamped about the 10 Minute Challenge…

Ever wanted to write a book, learn to knit or organize your photos? What about your talent for sewing going to waste even though style ideas keep dancing in your head? Why can’t you get to a project, passion or something you’ve been meaning to do for months? Stop procrastinating.  Now’s the time!!

But where to find the time?
When kids have to be chauffeured here and there, your mom needs help recovering from an illness and your job soaks up every ounce of energy, time is precious. But finding time is easier than you think. Just set aside 10 minutes every day and you’ll be on your way to learning the piano, journaling or reading novels for your book club. Chip away at whatever it is you want to do. The secret is to do a little at a time.  Be patient and over time you’ll reach your goal.

Can’t find 10 minutes?
Sure you can. We’re all dealing with the same 24 hours in a day. Think of someone who has a lot on their plate.  Maybe it’s your sister, boss or a world leader you admire.  These people seem to get things accomplished and you can too.  Here’s how:

  • Call in Your Support System – Enlist your significant other, kids, friends and family to help in some way to ease your tasks, chores and to do list. Maybe your son can walk the dog in the morning to afford you those 10 precious minutes. Or switch part of your workout routine to the afternoon - such as tummy crunches or running on the treadmill - and carve out 10 minutes there.

  • Find Your Optimal Time – When are you freshest and energized? For most people, it’s the morning. But you might be a night owl. Whenever you can be most productive, that’s when to use your 10 minutes.

  • Commit and Don’t Cheat – This is an investment in you. Dedicate yourself to a schedule and don’t skip YOUR time.

  • Time It – If your project starts sucking your energy and time you won’t want to come back to it.  Set a timer and at the end of 10 minutes,  STOP.  If you feel 10 minutes are not enough and you can squeeze out 5 or 10 extra minutes…great.  If not, don’t stress. Just keep your time manageable and set limits.

  • Now is the Time because “Someday I’ll May Never Come – Do you know someone who always wanted to do something butgrowyourseedsforsuccess never got the chance? Maybe your mom had dreams she never fulfilled or a friend became ill before she had the chance to do the things she could when she was healthy. Don’t let this happen to you! Find those 10 minutes so you don’t have to say, “If only I had…”, “Why didn’t I?”, or “I wish I could turn back the clock and ….”

Organize: Got a goal but no time? Log in 10 manageable minutes a day and little by little you’ll get closer to your goal.

NOTE: This article originally appeared on www.BloomOnLine.com and has been re-edited and published.

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