Hummus Delight

September 28, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under Bloomin in the Kitchen, What's New, snacks

Hummus made with freshly grown sprouts is a healthy variation to the traditional recipe. “Sprouts are  one of the healthiest foods you can grow in your kitchen for pennies and only a few minutes of time,”  claims Dr. Susan Smith Jones. This hummus recipe notably skips tahini and lessens the fat content, although you can add tahini for richer taste if desired.

hummus2 cups garbanzo beans (chickpeas), fresh cooked or canned (reserve the liquid) or use freshly sprouted beans
2 Tbsp. plus 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice
1–2 cloves garlic, pressed or finely minced
1/4 tsp. ground cumin
1 Tbsp. minced red onion
2 Tbsp. minced fresh parsley
1/4 tsp. sea salt
Cayenne pepper to taste
Fresh cracked pepper to taste

In a food processor, blend the chickpeas, lemon juice, garlic, and cumin with some of the reserved liquid. If you are using your own sprouted garbanzo beans for the recipes, add enough water to give it the best consistency for you. Add parsley and red onion and season with salt and pepper. Pulse briefly to mix. Keep refrigerated until ready to serve.

Variations: For black-bean hummus, add 1/2 cup black beans to the recipe when blending. For roasted-red-pepper hummus, add 1/2 cup roasted red pepper to the recipe. For roasted-garlic hummus, add 3 tablespoons roasted garlic. For roasted-onion hummus, add 1⁄3 cup roasted onion and 1 tablespoon of fresh chives, minced. For dill-roasted-yellow-pepper hummus, add 3 tablespoons fresh minced dill and 1/2 cup roasted yellow pepper. For spicy hummus, add 1 jalapeno pepper, minced, and 1⁄8 tsp. cayenne. To any of the above recipes, add ¼–½ cup tahini, if you want a richer taste and don’t mind the extra fat or calories.z


Open-Face Hummus Red Clover Sandwich

Dr. Susan’s favorite sandwich can also be a raw-foods meal by using a raw cracker or toast and the raw hummus recipe above.

2 slices of whole grain bread or toast — you can also use a large-size cracker
Hummus Delight (recipe above)
Red clover sprouts
Tomato — sliced
Red onion — sliced

Spread the hummus on the toast or cracker, add onion, tomato, and Red Clover sprouts. The order doesn’t really matter except to spread on the hummus first. You can even drizzle it with some dressing, if you like. For a variation,  add some shredded carrot, strips of sweet bell peppers, or put all of the ingredients in a pocket of whole grain pita bread. Any way you build this sandwich, it will please your taste buds.

Serves 1-2

You’ll find a variety of recipes for hummus in Dr. Susan Smith Jones’ full color recipe book Recipes for Health Bliss: Using NatureFoods & Lifestyle Choices to Rejuvenate Your Body & Life

LISTEN: Sprouting Your Way to Vitality (Dr. Susan on Bloom Talk)



Roasted Garlic

garlic1Recipe and comments from Health Bliss: Using Nature Foods & Lifestyle Choices to Rejuvenate Your Body & Life authored by Dr. Susan Smith Jones:

This simple-to-make treat is delicious and nutritious. A couple of times each week, you can smell garlic roasting in my home. Slowly baked, it becomes mild and so soft that you can spread it on bread, toast or crackers like butter. Bake several heads at a time and keep them in the fridge, then warm them up in the microwave for a few seconds before using. I often squeeze all of the soft cloves from their skins and put them in a small bowl to use in a variety of dishes such as mashed potatoes, soups, salads, dips, spreads, sauces, and

marinades.

6 heads garlic
1/2 tsp. dried thyme
1/2 tsp. sea salt
nonstick cooking spray
water

Preheat oven to 300° F. Slice ½ inch off the top of each garlic head (not the root end). Rub off as much loose garlic skin as possible without separating the cloves. Lightly spray a small baking dish with nonstick cooking spray. Place the skinned garlic heads, cut-side up, clustered together in the baking dish. Sprinkle the top of each head with a dash of salt and thyme. Add ¼–1⁄3 cup of purified water to the baking pan, surrounding the garlic. Cover and bake until the cloves are tender when pierced with a knife and beginning to pop out, about 60 – 90 minutes, depending on the size. If you turn up the

ROASTED GARLIC

oven to a higher temperature, it roasts faster. Serve hot or cooled to room temperature. I sometimes serve a whole head of garlic to each of my guests. They can squeeze out the soft cloves from the skins to spread on baguette toast or any variety of whole-grain breads, instead of using butter or margarine.

Variation 1: Instead of salt, drizzle some tamari or Bragg Liquid Aminos over the top of each head. It gives them a nice flavor and darker color. Or substitute other herbs such as oregano, rosemary, basil, dill, cilantro, chives, or cumin for the thyme.

Variation 2: Take 3–4 heads of garlic, separate all of the cloves, and peel away all of the skin. Discard any cloves that are very small. In a small saucepan, combine the garlic cloves with ½ cup Vegetable Broth. Bring to a high simmer, cover, reduce heat to a gentle simmer, and cook until the cloves are tender but not mushy, about 20 minutes. Check periodically to make sure the broth hasn’t evaporated. If necessary, add some more. When cooked, the cloves are as soft as butter, easy to use, and will last 2–3 days in the refrigerator.

Garlic is a superfood that has been studied worldwide for its medicinal properties. It’s packed with antioxidants known to fend off cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, and overall aging.

By Susan Smith Jones, PhD ©. Health Bliss: Using Nature Foods & Lifestyle Choices to Rejuvenate Your Body & Life published by Hay House Publishers and available at www.SusanSmithJones.com

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LISTEN: Dr. Susan Smith Jones on
Bloom Talk
Surefire Ways to Expand, Love, Intimacy & Romance

Spring Cleaning for Your Body

January 26, 2011 by Barb Scala  
Filed under Bloom Talk

894079

It’s a change of seasons. Find out about changing your routine to cleanse & detoxify.

Guest: Susan Smith Jones PhD author of  over 25 books on health and wellness including The Joy Factor: 10 Sacred Practices to Radiant Health (forward written by Dr. Wayne Dyer)

Note: Please consult with your doctor or any qualified health professional before using any product, diet or program discussed within these podcasts.

1287513682_escucha-musicstore-music-headphone
LISTEN on Bloom Talk
PART 1 - Podcast: Recorded March 31, 2011 (24 min)

1287513682_escucha-musicstore-music-headphone
LISTEN on Bloom Talk
PART 2 - Podcast: Recorded March 31, 2011 (22 min)

Anyone who knows me, knows that once a week I go vegan. I eat lighter, a variety of veggies and fruit and lots of water. No sugar, meats or dairy. I feel great after this once a week ritual which tends to keep me on track with my healthy lifestyle. But, I wanted to know more about cleansing and detoxifying, so I asked Dr. Susan Smith Jones if she could fill us in.

“When you look in the mirror are you looking and feeling your best? If not, maybe it’s a time to embark on a detox and rejuvenation program.”

Dr. Susan claims that a detox and rejuvenation cleanse helps prevent the onset of disease. She should know because she also claims not to have had a cold or taken medications in over 25 years!

With her holistic approach to keeping your body in balance, Dr. Susan answers our questions about body cleansing in this two part series. What is a cleanse and detox program?  What to eat and avoid when you are cleansing? Are there other ways to detox? How to start? And don’t miss Part 2 with Susan’s 10 steps to an easy body detox and cleanse program.

Guest Website: www.susansmithjones.com